Integrative research for understanding intersectional stress among pregnant Black women: Postulates for music therapy and biological assessments

Authors

  • Joanne V. Loewy
  • Elizabeth Corwin Columbia University, NYC
  • Dean Jones Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Abstract

Musical auditory stimulation impacts the brain and autonomic nervous system, yet few studies have undertaken a cross-analysis of music-centered interventions with biologic measurements to address the inter-connectivity between mind and body fragility in disparate cultures. Such analyses are now possible with evidence-based live music therapy interventions, compelling psychological and physical relaxation strategies, and untargeted metabolomics assessment, providing rich resources to address the succinct points of stress for pregnant Black women. This article will present the integral factors that we believe enhance subsequent investigative protocols. Highlighting integrative nursing research whereby critical biomarkers can be paired with behavioral assessments such as music therapy will likely lead toward innovative, interdisciplinary evaluative considerations that can render findings leading toward improved birth outcomes in at-risk populations. In defining uniquely separate strategic modalities prior to organizing communal research goals, our pursuit of encapsulating cultural relevance and vulnerabilities is refined and strengthened. The presented postulates further define and clarify options highlighting novel, collaborative and integrative approaches to evaluate and help underserved populations.

Author Biographies

Elizabeth Corwin, Columbia University, NYC

Elizabeth Corwin is the Vice Dean of Strategic and Innovative Research at Columbia University in NYC.

Dean Jones, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Dean Jones is a Professor of Medicine and the Director of the Clinical Biomarkers Laboratory at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Published

2022-04-29

Issue

Section

Full Length Articles