Moral Injury and Music Therapy: Music as a vehicle for access

Torrey Gimpel

Abstract


Moral Injury as a construct continues to be explored and refined as researchers develop models of treatment and clearer definitions for diagnosis. The complexity of moral injury mirrors the complexity of the combat experience- distinctive situations where required actions (e.g., killing) within war may lead to transgressions of deeply held moral or ethical principles within the individual. These transgressive acts may lead to inner conflicts that are outside the typical purview of traditional PTSD treatment. Music therapy offers unique vehicle for access to the inner conflict of MI and combat-related traumatic experiences while promoting expression, present-moment support, and creating opportunities for new perspectives through the malleable medium of music.

Keywords: Moral Injury (MI); Military; Music Therapy; PTSD, Transgressive events


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References


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