Actually, Music Therapy does work

Alan Turry

Abstract


Improvisational music therapy is effective when engagement between the therapist and the client takes place. Moreover, the effectiveness of music therapy will be measured more effectively by researchers if they focus on how it builds  on strengths rather than determining its effectiveness in reducing symptoms. The author is commenting on the TIME-A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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References


References

Bieleninik L, Geretsegger M, Mossler K, et al. Effects of improvisational music therapy vs enhanced standard care on symptom severity among children with autism spectrum disorder: the TIME-A randomized clinical trial. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2017; 318(6), 525-535.

Turry A. Response to effects of improvisational music therapy vs. enhanced standard care on symptom severity among children with autism spectrum disorder: the TIME-A randomized clinical trial. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy. 2017; 87-89.

Mössler K, Gold C, Aßmus J, Schumacher K, Calvet C, Reimer S, Iversen G, Schmid W. The Therapeutic Relationship as Predictor of Change in Music Therapy with Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2017. doi: 10.1007/s10803-017-3306-y

Schumacher K, Calvet C, Reimer S. The EBQ—Assessment of the Quality of the Relationship and its Developmental Psychological Basis (2nd ed). Gottengen: Vandenhoek & Ruprecht; 2013.

Lord C, Rutter M, DiLavore P, & Risi S. Autism Diagnostic observation schedule (ADOS). Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services; 2013.

Silberman S. NeuroTribes: The legacy of autism and the future of neurodiversity. New York, NY: Penguin Random House LLC; 2015.


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by The International Association for Music & Medicine